2-23-2010 The Day in Review

[ ![](http://blog.stanfordreview.org/content/images/2010/02/michael_steele-223x300.jpg "Michael Steele")](http://blog.stanfordreview.org/content/images/2010/02/michael_steele.jpg)
Hey Big Spender!
Oprah’s set is made out of [chocolate](http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2010/02/conspicuous-consumption-on-display-on-completely-edible-oprah-set.html). Why?

Governor Jim Gibbons has either had a ton of sex in the last fifteen years, or none at all.

Latin America and the Caribbean trade the USA and Canada for Cuba.

Bad, $$$teele, bad!

Tech-savvy celebrities Twitter around Moscow as special US delegates.

*Newsweek *calls Rielle Hunter pretty dignified…for a mistress?

Dana Milibank is displeased with Scott Brown’s first Senate vote.

Dick Cheney sustained a heart attack and was hospitalized.

David Brooks calls the healthcare bill a “fiscal time bomb.” Ross Douthat seconds the sentiment. Ezra Klein counters.

Brendan Koerner pens a paean to goofing off.

What’s that about? IVF less successful for Asians.

Important study makes bold claim: “Angry Husbands linked to Depressed Women.”

These CGI reenactments never get old. Here’s British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, who has been subject to rumors of physically abusing his staff:

Matt Yglesias considers inefficiencies in the political system.

David Goldman rather skeptically profiles Stratfor, a company that charges a fee to provide long-term geopolitical predictions.

FEATURED ARTICLE:

New York Times Magazineprofiles Scott Brown.

ON THIS DAY:

[![](http://blog.stanfordreview.org/content/images/2010/02/0000057985_20090609173810-225x300.jpg "Betty Draper")](http://blog.stanfordreview.org/content/images/2010/02/0000057985_20090609173810.jpg)
No Wonder She Went to Nevada
1915: Nevada enacts a law today that makes divorce far [easier than anywhere else](http://www.amctv.com/originals/madmen/episode313) in the country. One year of legal residence in the Silver State was required to be eligible for divorce.

W.E.B. DuBois was born today in 1868.

John Keats died today in 1821, John Quincy Adams in 1848.

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