2-25-2010 The Day in Review

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Barack, Let Me Say Something!
Obama and Republicans come together and [hold](http://www.latimes.com/news/nation-and-world/la-na-health-main26-2010feb26,0,1579839.story) a big, boring healthcare summit. Thank God for Joe Biden’s inevitable [gaffe](http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Politics/The-Vote/2010/0225/Joe-Biden-on-healthcare-summit-This-could-end-up-not-being-good.).

Hamas’ founder’s son is revealed to have been an Israeli informant.

Chemical spill and evacuation on campus.

Libertarian paternalism alert! An entirely non-creepy study on avatars reveals they can mold behavior.

Stanford health experts fight tuberculosis in North Korea.

What a time for vowels! It’s E-Week this week, and iWeek next. Bonus points if you can guess what both stand for without peeking.

SIEPR invents the creatively named SIEPR Prize, gives it to Paul Volcker.

For political magazines, it can be good when your side loses.

Ross Douthat elaborates on why he opposes the healthcare bill.

Marc Ambinder says to watch out for Jim DeMint in 2012.

Hearing about your brain on drugs makes your brain more likely to end up on drugs.

Survey: boo democracy.

Really, people? Confusion abounds as to how to avoid lung cancer.

That Obama loves the Facebook.

James Lindsay and Ray Takeyh discuss what to do if Iran succeeds in getting a nuclear weapon.

A new book has more hilarious revelations about the epic feud between Tony Blair and Gordon Brown.

A Washington Monthly article examines the ups and downs of DNA testing.

FEATURED ARTICLE:

Chuck Klosterman profiles Stephen Malkmus, the frontman of Pavement, the so-called greatest, indie-ist band ever.

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Bobby Riggs
**ON THIS DAY:**

Samuel Colt patented his revolver in 1836.

Tennis player and notorious hustler Bobby Riggs born in 1918. If you have a minute, read this profile of the guy from right after he won the battle of the sexes (they’d hold another one later that he’d lose).

Playwright Tennessee Williams rode his final Streetcar Named Desire in 1983.

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