2-28-2011 Week in Review

[![](http://blog.stanfordreview.org/content/images/2011/03/marguerite-225x300.jpg "marguerite")](http://blog.stanfordreview.org/content/images/2011/03/marguerite.jpg)
The new Marguerite Shuttle signs seem to contain some subliminal messaging.
This week:

The Marguerite reorganizes their routes, several signs now subliminally read “no sex.”

The Supreme Court rules in favor of the First Amendment, recognizing Westboro Baptist Church’s right to exhibit signs reading “Thank God for Dead Soldiers” at a recent military funeral.

Harvard lets ROTC return to campus.

Study shows 60% of students at Columbia support ROTC’s reinstatement as well.

Political pundits Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum have had their contracts suspende d for considering running for president. Fox News Corporation cites participation in a presidential election as a conflict of interest, representing a decisive stance against journalists with active roles in the political process–see: see Sarah Palin, Glenn Beck, Elliot Spitzer, Stephen Colbert, etc.

Havoc ensues as Northwestern University formally denounces a public sex act in a class on unconventional sexuality.

The iPad 2 is unveiled by Apple, with Steve Jobs claiming that 2011 will be “the year of the iPad.”

Breaking News! Natalie Portman proves that pretty people can be smart too!

[![](http://blog.stanfordreview.org/content/images/2011/03/huck-300x199.jpg "huck")](http://blog.stanfordreview.org/content/images/2011/03/huck.jpg)
Mike Huckabee, former governor of Arkansas. (Wikimedia Commons: David Ball)
Unfortunately that doesn’t make [Mike Huckabee](http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0311/50638.html) see her as any less of an abomination.

Featured Article:

Foreign Affairs– The Tea Party and American Foreign Policy

On this Day:

Henry the Navigator was apparently born in 1394.

Congress met for the first time in 1789, first putting the Constitution into effect.

1861 – President Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated for his first term as President of the United States.

In 1911 Victor Berger made history as the first socialist to be elected to the U.S. congress (Wisconsin).

The Supreme Court ruled, in 1998, in Oncale v. Sundowner Offshore Services that federal laws banning on-the-job sexual harassment apply when both parties are the same sex, further advancing homosexual rights and gender equality.

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