3-17-2010 The Day in Review

[![](http://blog.stanfordreview.org/content/images/2010/03/tiger-woods-masters-192x300.jpg)](http://blog.stanfordreview.org/content/images/2010/03/tiger-woods-masters.jpg)
Tiger Woods Wearing St. Patrick's Day / Masters' Outfit
Tiger Woods [vows](http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/17/sports/golf/17tiger.html?th&emc=th) to return to golf at the Masters. But is it [TOO SOON](http://www.theawl.com/2010/03/tiger-woods-too-soon)?

Stanford women’s basketball team is a #1 seed in the NCAA tournament. Pres. Obama sides with UConn (and Kansas in the men’s draw).

Jennifer Bleyer reports on well-to-do hipsters on food stamps.

Three suicides at Cornell. The Cornell Insider reports here, here, and here.

Michael Jordan buys the Charlotte Bobcats, NY Times helpfully points out that they cost less in a bad economy. TDIR waits anxiously for Larry Ellison to buy the Golden State Warriors.

What’s killing you now? C02, says a Stanford study.

Senate passes Jobs (not stimulus!) bill with 11 votes from Republicans.

Stanford scientists get down to solving life’s important problems. What is the deal with those bubbles in Guinness?

Mike Tyson and pigeons. Need I say more?

Rex Brynen reports on the peculiar economy of Gaza.

Scott Adams bemoans complexity.

Will Saletan thinks politicians should not worry so much about reelection. Jonathan Bernstein counters.

Britain bans ads exaggerating global warming claims.

Universal passes on potentially awesome Scientology movie.

Famous writers had to work too.

Fox News’ Bret Baier interviews Barack Obama, who nods politely.

Candace de Russy remembers Ralph McInerny.

Prisoners beat up Bernie Madoff.

Jessica Pressler is not impressed by Lehman Brothers’ accounting.

Rabbis use Twitter to try to get the kids pumped up for Passover.

FEATURED ARTICLE:

Jeffrey Toobin wonders what the Supreme Court will look like without John Paul Stevens.

ON THIS DAY:

In 1845, the rubber band is patented.

Nat King “Unforgettable” Cole born in 1919.

Yes, St. Patrick died in 493, but so did George Kennan in 2005 (at the age of 101, no less!)

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