3-4-2010 The Day in Review

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Valerie Jarrett Rocked Barack. But Could She Rock Stanford?
Senior Obama advisor (adviser?) and Stanford alum Valerie Jarrett [spoke](http://news.stanford.edu/news/2010/march/valerie-jarrett-lecture-030410.html) at Stanford. In other Valerie Jarrett news, she’s [privy](http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2010/03/04/new-book-says-obama-e-mailed-jarrett-rove-hates/) to awesome Obama secrets such as “Karl Rove hates me.”

Facebook ads: brilliantly targeted or “creepy but off-putting?”

Take that, ASSU Book Exchange! George Mason uses a much more efficient (albeit crack-based) system.

NPR profiles campus rapists. Matt Yglesias and Robert VerBruggen add their thoughts.

How a stupid rumor gets started.

Alex Massie harshes on Tony Blair’s memoir cover.

Stanford English Prof. George Dekker died at the age of 75.

Joint study between Stanford and Edinburgh University finds that computers have more trouble recognizing male voices. Different study to find that humans form Stanford and Edinburgh University have trouble recognizing each others’ voices.

Stanford Alum Goodwin Liu was nominated to the U.S. Appeals Court. He may have already hit his first bump in the road.

Gay marriage now legal in Washington, D.C.

Ross Douthat pins Mitch Daniels’ bad estimate on the Iraq war on faulty premises (read: it’s not his fault).

Lyndon LaRouche-ite (if you don’t know what that’s about, wikipedia provides a good start) and supporter of Pres. Obama’s impeachment Kesha Rogers wins the Democratic Primary in Texas-22. One man suggests the Republicans cede the race. Also, she plans to fling our soldiers into space.

An unknown gunman shot two Pentagon police officers earlier today. Both officers, who were wearing bullet-proof vests, suffered graze wounds, while the shooter died after being shot down.

Rogue waves” strike a Mediterranean cruise ship, killing two passengers.

Simon Johnson explains where the dangers are and are not with big banks.

File this one under pouring salt in (one of) David Paterson’s wounds.

PS eh? Canadians and their silly public service announcements.

Abe Sauer nominates Apple for an Oscar.

Does making more cows justify eating them? Discuss.

David Broder picks a fight with his colleague Dana Milbank over the efficacy of Rahm Emanuel.

Walter Russell Mead calls out the New York Times’ environmental coverage for not being skeptical enough.

Even though Google News says it has 14,000 stories, but really it’s just 24 events.

Christopher Hitchens reevaluates the Ten Commandments.

FEATURED ARTICLE:

William Deresiewicz’s address at the US Military Academy last October draws a connection between solitude and leadership.

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Japanese Woodblock of Matthew Perry
**ON THIS DAY:**

In 1997, Bill Clinton bans federally funded human cloning research. In 1997, Bill Clinton bans federally funded human cloning research.

Fresh off his primary (and if we’re being honest here, complete) victory in the race for the Texas governor’s office, Rick Perry celebrates his 60th.

Commodore Matthew Perry, who among other things opened Japan to the west, died in 1854

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