5-16-2010 The Day in Review

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Sure, He Can Win the Boothe Prize. But Can He Get Confirmed?
Stanford men’s tennis [advances](http://www.paloaltoonline.com/news/show_story.php?id=16871) to the Round of 16.

Stanford’s Goodwin Liu advances to a Senate vote after a party line vote got him out of committee.

Robert Gates defines the future of American security assistance.

Megan McArdle is impressed with QVC.

America has faith.

Joel Kotkin bids adieu to Europe’s demographic superiority. Richard Haass piles on.

The Powwow goes viral.

Daniel Castro imagines tomorrow.

Bruce Schneier attacks risk aversion.

Graeme Wood notes the presence of witches in the courts of the Central African Republic with some optimism.

The oil keeps flowing.

James Parker dubs Lady Gaga the last pop star.

Doug Merino reports on Liberian dictator Charles Taylor’s bizarre trial in The Hague.

Paul Krugman compares America favorably to Greece. What a relief.

Michael Kinsley calls the Tea Party Patriots unpatriotic.

David Brooks sees hope in Britain’s new government.

Conor Friedersdorf has had enough of New York City.

Candidate for Governor Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom pitches a gas tax at Stanford.

Make a note: Charles Blow guarantees conservatives will crash and burn.

Stanford Professor emeritus of economics Roger Noll has some thoughts on Measure J.

Sinan Antoon doubts an Arabic internet will be a big problem solver.

Will Title IX reach its illogical conclusion? Keep an eye on women’s flag football.

New York Times Public Editor Clark Hoyt minces words.

FEATURED ARTICLE:

Greg Miller explains how our memory works.

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No, You The Man
**ON THIS DAY:**

Charles Elmer Hires invented root beer in 1866.

The always-understated Liberace was born in 1919.

Sammy Davis, Jr. died in 1990.

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