5-6-2010 The Day in Review

[![](http://blog.stanfordreview.org/content/images/2010/05/dcposter-300x149.jpg "dcposter")](http://blog.stanfordreview.org/content/images/2010/05/dcposter.jpg)
Is This Shiny, Airbrushed Man Britain's Prime Minister? Maybe
British election. [Somebody](http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/election2010/2962442/Cameron-can-win-as-Tories-gain-key-seats.html) won. Or [not](http://blogs.reuters.com/uknews/2010/05/07/gordon-brown-will-seek-deal-with-libdems/). Who knows? We’ll let you know what happened tomorrow.

NFL great Lawrence Taylor has been arrested on rape charges.

John Hennessey is not sanguine about China’s prospects for developing a top-flight university any time soon.

That guy who let you in to Stanford resigned.

Apparently Google Maps can do stuff you never imagined it could.

Bing Concert Hall undergoes construction at Stanford.

Paid Content finds some more startling numbers regarding the pending sale of Newsweek.

Rupert Darwall sums up why British voters are dissatisfied with Labour.

A Muslim woman in Italy was fined for wearing a burqa.

Dr. Dement explains your dreams’ purpose.

David Brooks and Gail Collins square off on the topic of Pres. Obama’s temperament.

Daniel Engber has a theory for why we love of underdogs. Jonah Lehrer follows up.

Bruce Schneier believes terrorism is harder to execute than people think.

Google is apparently ripping off Bing.

Joe the Plumber is elected to public office.

George Will sees time running out in Afghanistan.

Harry Reid has a rather interesting way of accusing the GOP of supporting bankers.

British elections come tonight. Alex Massie has a reading list.

Stanford researchers declare there will never be privacy on Facebook, so get used to being invaded.

FEATURED ARTICLE:

Kevin Williamson urges Republicans to get serious about spending.

ON THIS DAY:

Oh, the humanity! The German zeppelin Hindenburg caught fire and exploded in Lakehurst, New Jersey, in 1937 killing thirty-six.

Sigmund Freud slipped into the world in 1856.

L. Frank Baum made his last journey to Oz in 1919.

Subscribe to the Stanford Review