Class of 2017 Releases FMOTQ Survey Results, Confirms Supermajority of Students Reject Changes

This evening, the Stanford Class of 2017 Presidents released the results of a comprehensive survey taken on Full Moon on the Quad. The survey followed uproar on campus and a successful Review-initiated petition last quarter to restore FMOTQ, after the Stanford administration announced its plans to suspend funding and support for the event in an ASSU Senate meeting.

1015 Stanford students responded to the survey, which was sent out to the student body last quarter. Contrary to claims by Vice Provost Greg Boardman that Stanford “students [were] questioning the past and creating new customs and practices”, and wanted FMOTQ to evolve, 69% of students said they “like FMOTQ as it is”. 93% favored keeping FMOTQ as-is with only minor changes, confirming the 89% majority that the FMOTQ petition received in elections.

Dozens of students expressed their enjoyment for the event in the survey’s comments section, and argued that FMOTQ is safer with the resources and security only Stanford can provide. Many pointed out that FMOTQ would likely occur unofficially regardless of Vice Provost Boardman’s inclinations, and that the unofficial FMOTQ would be significantly less safe. Some specific messages of support included statements that:

  • ‘I love FMOTQ and I think it’s a highlight of the year. Please don’t get rid of it.’
  • ‘Full Moon is a pretty gross event. But that doesn’t mean we should get rid of it. [Instead,] get rid of the grossness.’
  • ‘This is not some kind of Cardinal Nights b******* where you can pull the wool over our eyes and pretend we like it. A tradition cannot be “new.”‘
  • ‘I think it’s the safest party on campus and definitely the most secure.’
  • ‘There are few more affirming spaces for queer and questioning students on college campuses in this country than Stanford’s own FMOTQ.’

Others, however, contended that FMOTQ had its flaws:

  • It could be replaced by ‘something that involves lots of free food and dancing.’
  • ‘[It] is at least a public health concern to have people indiscriminately spreading their germs, and at worst an opportunity for sexual harassment (if not worse). [At] the very least FMOTQ needs to eliminate naked people from entering the event.’

This article will be updated with further information as it arrives.

Survey results can be found in full here. The original Facebook posting from the class presidents can be found here.

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