Senate Endorsement 2010: Bennett Siegel

**Name two goals that you will have accomplished by the end of your Senate term. **

I want to reform appropriations to ensure that there is flexible but responsible student group funding. There needs to be more accountability in decision-making, more engagement with the student body, more consistency in the use of funds, and ultimately more effective – and less wasteful – spending.

Secondly, I want to reform Student Activities and Leadership (SAL) to make the party planning system more efficient, responsive, and student-friendly. That means shortening the notification and approval time needed for parties to within 48 hours and aiding Greek organizations in paying for University-mandated security so more events are financially feasible.

**Which two current ASSU initiatives or programs would you push to eliminate? **

With an operating budget in 2009 of $5,600, odd operating hours and low student attendance, the Wellness room (and the larger program) is an unnecessary drain on sparse resources that could better be spent on other initiatives that more directly benefit the student body and promote mental health on campus.

The ASSU shuttle program, which buses students leaving for vacation to San Francisco and San Jose airport, should be eliminated. Last spring, it reportedly cost $54.70 per rider and only 46% of available tickets were purchased. Though a valuable service, there are better and more efficient ways to spent University funds.

Notable Issue Positions:

National and International Issues:

I believe that the ASSU first and foremost is an institution designed to address student issues on campus. As a result, the Senate should not comment on national or international affairs, beyond its role in funding student groups that promote important campus-wide debate.

Appropriations Policy:

As discussed earlier, I am a fiscal pragmatist. In past years, Senators have overspent their budgets dramatically almost leading to complete financial insolvency for the ASSU.  I want to create an enduring and sustainable financial cycle within the Senate that will not lead to excess spending in some years and a lack of funds in others.

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