The Power’s Out and the Alerts are Annoying

After maxing out all of my Snooze options, I overslept this morning.  It’s a terrible feeling, you know.

But yes, I overslept, and I later had the pleasure of being awoken by those ugly,  obnoxiously loud phones that every Stanford-housed student must pay for.  Now, this post is not a rant about how Stanford has a mandatory fee for an essentially useless utility *or *how Stanford charges *every *room occupant for a single phone.  Rather, this post is meant to highlight the content of that phone message (the only real message I think I received on that phone all year).

Anyway, Stanford’s electricity is out right now and should be back on within a few hours.  That’s what the message said.  If I’d woken up, tried to turn on the light, and been frustrated, I could have figured that out myself.  The message goes on to inform the listener that classes will be held at the instructors’ discretion.  Great, so I still have to do my homework.

This is ArlertSU system is FUN*. * I got that call, a call on my cell (my *actual *phone, go figure), an email, and a text message.  In a real emergency, those would of course be crucial modes of contact, but at 8:15am I think it was overkill even if it did prevent me from oversleeping.

However, I did learn something new about this new technological-advanced alert system.  AlertSU does give me options for my preferred modes of contact, which I seem to have ignored in my quest to ignore everything official at Stanford.  The last portion of my AlertSUAwesomeEmail reads:

—–About this E-mail—–

Modify alert notification settings: This e-mail has been sent to you by STANFORD UNIVERSITY as part of our alert notification system. To learn more about the system or if you do not wish to receive further notifications, please visit http://alertsu.stanford.edu/. Thank you.

I think I’m just going to set my alert to go to that stupid in-room phone so that it’s a little less useless.  But I think I will drop the text message alert because I’m limited to 200 texts a month, and that really was not worth it.  Plus, I don’t need my phone taunting everything else in my room with its fancy battery life.

Now I’m going to go read by the gray daylight because Stanford banned candles.  I’ll put myself in a better mood, then I’ll be good to go.  Good luck, people.  Good luck.

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