4-29-2010 The Day in Review

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The Retouched Speaker
Kris Kobach [defends](http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/29/opinion/29kobach.html?th&emc=th) Arizona’s new immigration law. The law [appears](http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_IMMIGRATION_DAY_LABOR?SITE=FLTAM&SECTION=US) to be having an impact already.

George Packer makes an unflattering comparison between Politico’s Mike Allen and Burmese blogger Nay Phone Latt.

NPR finds some stupid things a smart phone can do.

Nancy Pelosi, airbrushed.

Kate Chesley commemerates the 40th Anniversary of Stanford’s Office of Technology Licensing.

Daniel Larison looks into Charlie Crist’s future.

Jim Manzi analyzes an old study on choice by Stanford’s Shanto Iyengar.

Charles Kenny is not afraid of overpopulation.

Nerds reminisce about their first time. With a computer.

The Magic 8-Ball is now being made into a movie.

Everyone is still excited about George W. Bush’s memoir, right? No? How about Laura Bush’s?

Eric Morris breaks down drunk driving statistics.

Pope Benedict XVI may apologize.

New York State Senator plays the race card.

Jon Stewart turns on Apple.

Reihan Salam cannot contain his delight at Charlie Crist’s departure from the Republican Party.

Kathleen Parker defends freedom of speech and cartooning.

Steve Carell will likely leave his role as Michael Scott on The Office.

FEATURED ARTICLE:

The Time 100 came out, and if Ted Nugent’s paean to Sarah Palin doesn’t make you laugh, certainly Bono’s ode to Bill Clinton will.




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What's the deal with airplane food?
**ON THIS DAY:**

Allied forces liberated the Dachau Concentration Camp in 1945.

Jerry Seinfeld was born in 1954.

Alfred Hitchcock died in 1980. Or did he?

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