Senate Endorsement 2010: Carolyn Simmons

**Name two goals that you will have accomplished by the end of your Senate term. **

Last year, on average, senators showed up to only 75% of meetings—an average C grade in representing the student body shouldn’t cut it. I want to represent undergraduates and hold senators accountable for their commitment to the ASSU, so next year I will ensure that existing attendance policies are adhered to and that senator committee and subcommittee attendance is published at the end of every meeting. Furthermore, I will work with Student Activities and Leadership to streamline the process of planning events by establishing a formal liaison between senators and students. This liaison will be responsible for directing students and volunteer student organizations to specific Senators so that issues may be promptly addressed.

**Which two current ASSU initiatives or programs would you push to eliminate? **

While the ASSU Shuttle Program offers a great convenience to students, it operates at less than half capacity and at high cost. Cheaper alternatives such as the Supershuttle accomplish many of the same goals. Secondly, mental health on Stanford campus is a pertinent issue that by no means should be neglected, yet various programs included in Wellness Week 2010 were ill-targeted. Rather than play with “adorable puppies” or enjoy a free massage, I would have preferred to work with the Bridge or other counseling services to support events targeted to those suffering from mental health issues.

Notable Issue Positions:

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National and International Issues:

Stanford’s response to the earthquake in Haiti has shown that in times of need, the ASSU can play an admirable role in organizing aid and informing students of issues ranging from the local to international level. However, it is important to keep Senators’ primary focus on those whom they represent, the undergraduate student body. Ultimately, I want to make this University a better place, and by only addressing the issues that directly impact students, ASSU can make sure that all interests are treated equally and promptly. I want to explore initiatives that generate greater resources for this diverse Stanford community.

Academic Life:

Last year, the administration cut important peer advising programs. My generation of Stanford students will not know the benefits of a peer advising system that included the Peer Academic Coordinator (HPAC) and the Peer Mentoring program. Peer advising offers a unique perspective on the academic operations of the University, one that Academic Directors simply cannot provide. I want to explore the possibility of reinstalling these two programs by either lowering coordinator pay or offering slightly shorter training periods. I want students to be aware of all opportunities that this University provides so that they may be able to make the most of their years here.

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